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Ironclad Warrior - Art Prints

Battleship Artwork Reviews - Technical

The Nebula Hawk Battleship Seaport provides reviews of Battleship artwork.

HMS Warrior 1860 - Hull Form and Clipper Bow

HMS Warrior is considered to be 'one of the first' true ironclads (if not indeed the first) - as she was equipped with a hull form, that was made entirely of iron:


HMS Warrior 1860 - Hull Form and Clipper Bow


Warrior's hull form, made use of iron, both internally (such as in her bulkheads and frames) and externally (such as in her 4.5 inch thick belt armour). For 1860, this was a marvellous achievement - as all preceding warships, had only ever been constructed, with wooden hull forms (including their bulkheads, frames and armour). Despite this, Warrior still needed to be based upon the warships of the past (such as HMS Victory) - so Warrior's hull from, was essentially a wooden design, that was constructed in iron! As such, it was expected that her manoeuvrability, would be similar to that of previous ships of the line - so she retained their clipper bow (which improved her sea keeping).

14/05/2018 | Nebula Hawk | Web: HMS Warrior 1860 - Art Prints, Mug, Museum

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HMS Warrior 1860 - Steam Engines and Propeller

HMS Warrior is considered to be 'rather unique' as a warship - as she was equipped with both sails, and a steam engine (that was fuelled by coal):


HMS Warrior 1860 - Steam Engines and Propeller


This meant that she could navigate the oceans of the World, using one of three modes: i) just her sails. ii) just her steam engine. iii) both her sails and her steam engine - when speed was of the essence! Her sails, though retained from the days of HMS Victory (1803), also meant that Warrior had a useful fallback, in the event that she run out of coal. Despite this, her steam engine was connected to a single propeller, which could be regarded as the grandfather of all modern ship propellers (because it was of a simpler design - with only two blades). In any case, Warrior's propeller was designed, to push her 9000 tons, through the sea lanes of the British Empire.

14/05/2018 | Nebula Hawk | Web: HMS Warrior 1860 - Art Prints, Mug, Museum

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HMS Hood 1937 - Stern View

The stern view of HMS Hood. From here, you can see her four Manganese Bronze Propellers, which were responsible for powering her through, the World's Oceans:


HMS Hood 1937 - Stern View


You can also see, her anti-torpedo bulges (the outermost red hull form parts), which were designed to detonate an enemy torpedo, away from her vital innards (such as her boiler rooms, and her engines). This view, also best highlights a design flaw, which although it may not have affected her combat effectiveness too much, certainly affected her day to day operations: her stern deck was designed too low, and as such, was often awash - with sea water!

15/11/2017 | Nebula Hawk

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HMS Hood 1937 - Bow View

The bow view of HMS Hood. From here, you can make out the shear of her hull form:


HMS Hood 1937 - Bow View


Which both helped her sea-keeping, and reduced the chances, of an enemy shell penetrating her belt armour (by striking it an angle, as opposed to square on). You can also see, that Hood could bring to bear, just two forward naval gun turrets (aka four 15 inch shells) when approaching end on - as she did, on that fateful day (at the battle of the Denmark Strait), when she was lost, battling the Bismarck. This view also shows, another important fact about HMS Hood, from the shear number of windows and view slits, that are visible from this angle: how important visually sighting the enemy was, in a time before radar.

14/11/2017 | Nebula Hawk

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Ironclad Warrior - Art Prints